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Trekking Guide to Venezuela


With 42 national parks and about half as many nature reserves, all of which allow walking, Venezuela is a paradise for a walking holiday. A permit is required from the Inparques offices to visit the parks. Opportunities are available for all skill levels – for those who are more comfortable around well-developed tourist facilities, the Parque Nacional El Avila includes around 200km of signposted trails, most of which are not difficult. More serious trekkers can sign on for porter-assisted trips which scale the peaks and navigate the cloud forests of the great Andes. With 21 distinct ecosystems, Venezuela has whatever you’re looking for.

The go-to region for trekking and climbing is the area around Mérida, featuring high peaks such as the Pico Bolívar and the Pico Humboldt, as well as the magnificent Parque Nacional Sierra Nevada. Experienced guides are strongly recommended, and can be found in Merida, along with any rental equipment you require. In addition to the national park, popular destinations around Mérida include Los Nevados, a small village separated from Mérida by Pico Toro but accessibly via a fairly easy mountain track, and the moors and misty forests of the Sierra de la Culata. If you’re up for crampons and ice axes, the steep ascent to Humboldt Peak is an exhilarating challenge to both your mountaineering skills and your fortitude. The view from the top of Humboldt’s broad, flat glacier is unforgettable.

For a very different climb, make your way up Mount Roraima, which straddles the border between Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana. Roraima is the highest of Venezuela’s distinctive table mountains, called tepuis. The steep sides of the plateau would make the summit difficult to access, if not for a hidden ramp which spirals up the side. Roraima is so steep-sided and flat-topped, in fact, that the indigenous people see the mountain as the stump of a mighty tree which once held all of the world’s fruits. The top of Roraima is its own ecosystem, with a harsh, nutrient-deficient environment which has spawned a number of endemic, carnivorous plants. In fact, early expeditions to Roraima’s top were the inspiration for Conan Doyle’s “The Lost World.” Trekkers won’t find any dinosaurs, but the unique, endemic species found only in this high, flat place will indeed make it feel like an undiscovered land. Once on top, be sure to visit the Valle de los Cristales, a little canyon that sparkles with colored quartz crystals.

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Venezuela Articles

Trekking Guide to Venezuela


With 42 national parks and about half as many nature reserves, all of which allow walking, Venezuela is a paradise for a walking holiday!

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